UA-71913188-1
Waldwipfelweg

Our Animals

We have a lot of animals for you to look at and admire. Alpacas, llamas, blacknose sheep, and kangaroos contribute to the beauty of our park and make children‘s hearts beat faster. And adults also delight in the creatures you don‘t meet every day.

Alpakas

Their home is in South America. Already 6000 years ago alpacas were domesticated by the Inkas in the highlands of the Andes. Along with llamas they formed the existencial basis of the people in the high mountains. The llama was bred as a pack animal and for its meat. The fine fibre of the alpaca was used for clothing in order to defy the rattling cold. So alpacas and humans used to form close communities. After their drastic decimation by the Spanish Conquerers the local mountain farmers took care of them and benefited from their manifold characteristics for centuries. Thus they even prepared their way into our modern Europe. Alpacas are so called South American camelids and are members of the biological family Camelidae. Along with camels, guanacos, vicunas, and llamas they are the only currently living representatives of the suborder Tylopoda. Except in their native countries Peru, Chile, Bolivia alpacas have been successfully bred in the USA, Canada, Australia, England since the eighties and for some time in Europe, too.

Llamas

The llama is a kind of camel. It can be found in the Andes of South America and is a domesticated type of guanaco. In hardly accessible regions of the Andes the llama is still used as a pack animal. All in all in South America about 3 million llamas are still kept mostly for their fibre and meat. But in the meantime they are also bred in other countries, and even in Europe they are kept, their wool is shorn and processed. Llamas show their mood by their posture. Are their ears up and their tails hanging relaxed the llamas are fine and relaxed, too. Tail upright means tension and attention. Ears showing backwards and tail down are the signal for subordination to superior llamas or the person leading it. Ears showing backwards and tail upright tell us, the llama isn‘t well. If there are gurgling sounds in addition, it feels extremely unwell. If the ears are back a very long time and there is a second llama too close, it actually can spit a warning with its nose up in the air. But that rarely occurs. The reason  might be envy concerning food or fighting against each other. And that‘s the way a female tells the male to stop mating.

Blacknose Sheep (Valais Blacknose)

Typical are the black coloured nose, eyes, ears, front knees, ankles and hooves in the otherwise white fur. Females tend to have black tail spots. Both genders sport twisted horns. Males weigh beween 80 and 100 kg, females 70 to 80 kg on average. Wool covers their body, legs and head evenly. You can annually get 3.5 kg – 4.5 kg of wool from the males (rams), 3 – 4 kg from the females (ewes). It is rough, has got long fibres of more than 10 cm. After a long time of inbreeding the offspring lose the typical black colouring. The Blacknose can be with young at any time. They produce about 1.6 lambs per year and they mature late. The Valais Blacknose is adapted very well to the harsh conditions of living in the high mountains. They are territorial and  frugal, good climbers and able to graze even on the stoniest and the steepest slopes. Because of its appearance, long limbs, its horns, tough nature, and rough wool it is regarded as a primitive race, closely related to the ancestral sheep.
© Waldwipfelweg
© Waldwipfelweg 2016 Waldwipfelweg

Our Animals

We have a lot of animals for you to look at and admire. Alpacas, llamas, blacknose sheep, and kangaroos contribute to the beauty of our park and make children‘s hearts beat faster. And adults also delight in the creatures you don‘t meet every day.

Alpakas

Their home is in South America. Already 6000 years ago alpacas were domesticated by the Inkas in the highlands of the Andes. Along with llamas they formed the existencial basis of the people in the high mountains. The llama was bred as a pack animal and for its meat. The fine fibre of the alpaca was used for clothing in order to defy the rattling cold. So alpacas and humans used to form close communities. After their drastic decimation by the Spanish Conquerers the local mountain farmers took care of them and benefited from their manifold characteristics for centuries. Thus they even prepared their way into our modern Europe. Alpacas are so called South American camelids and are members of the biological family Camelidae. Along with camels, guanacos, vicunas, and llamas they are the only currently living representatives of the suborder Tylopoda. Except in their native countries Peru, Chile, Bolivia alpacas have been successfully bred in the USA, Canada, Australia, England since the eighties and for some time in Europe, too.

Llamas

The llama is a kind of camel. It can be found in the Andes of South America and is a domesticated type of guanaco. In hardly accessible regions of the Andes the llama is still used as a pack animal. All in all in South America about 3 million llamas are still kept mostly for their fibre and meat. But in the meantime they are also bred in other countries, and even in Europe they are kept, their wool is shorn and processed. Llamas show their mood by their posture. Are their ears up and their tails hanging relaxed the llamas are fine and relaxed, too. Tail upright means tension and attention. Ears showing backwards and tail down are the signal for subordination to superior llamas or the person leading it. Ears showing backwards and tail upright tell us, the llama isn‘t well. If there are gurgling sounds in addition, it feels extremely unwell. If the ears are back a very long time and there is a second llama too close, it actually can spit a warning with its nose up in the air. But that rarely occurs. The reason  might be envy concerning food or fighting against each other. And that‘s the way a female tells the male to stop mating.

Blacknose Sheep (Valais Blacknose)

Typical are the black coloured nose, eyes, ears, front knees, ankles and hooves in the otherwise white fur. Females tend to have black tail spots. Both genders sport twisted horns. Males weigh beween 80 and 100 kg, females 70 to 80 kg on average. Wool covers their body, legs and head evenly. You can annually get 3.5 kg – 4.5 kg of wool from the males (rams), 3 – 4 kg from the females (ewes). It is rough, has got long fibres of more than 10 cm. After a long time of inbreeding the offspring lose the typical black colouring. The Blacknose can be with young at any time. They produce about 1.6 lambs per year and they mature late. The Valais Blacknose is adapted very well to the harsh conditions of living in the high mountains. They are territorial and  frugal, good climbers and able to graze even on the stoniest and the steepest slopes. Because of its appearance, long limbs, its horns, tough nature, and rough wool it is regarded as a primitive race, closely related to the ancestral sheep.
© Waldwipfelweg 2015 Waldwipfelweg

Our Animals

We have a lot of animals for you to look at and admire. Alpacas, llamas, blacknose sheep, and kangaroos contribute to the beauty of our park and make children‘s hearts beat faster. And adults also delight in the creatures you don‘t meet every day.

Alpakas

Their home is in South America. Already 6000 years ago alpacas were domesticated by the Inkas in the highlands of the Andes. Along with llamas they formed the existencial basis of the people in the high mountains. The llama was bred as a pack animal and for its meat. The fine fibre of the alpaca was used for clothing in order to defy the rattling cold. So alpacas and humans used to form close communities. After their drastic decimation by the Spanish Conquerers the local mountain farmers took care of them and benefited from their manifold characteristics for centuries. Thus they even prepared their way into our modern Europe. Alpacas are so called South American camelids and are members of the biological family Camelidae. Along with camels, guanacos, vicunas, and llamas they are the only currently living representatives of the suborder Tylopoda. Except in their native countries Peru, Chile, Bolivia alpacas have been successfully bred in the USA, Canada, Australia, England since the eighties and for some time in Europe, too.

Llamas

The llama is a kind of camel. It can be found in the Andes of South America and is a domesticated type of guanaco. In hardly accessible regions of the Andes the llama is still used as a pack animal. All in all in South America about 3 million llamas are still kept mostly for their fibre and meat. But in the meantime they are also bred in other countries, and even in Europe they are kept, their wool is shorn and processed. Llamas show their mood by their posture. Are their ears up and their tails hanging relaxed the llamas are fine and relaxed, too. Tail upright means tension and attention. Ears showing backwards and tail down are the signal for subordination to superior llamas or the person leading it. Ears showing backwards and tail upright tell us, the llama isn‘t well. If there are gurgling sounds in addition, it feels extremely unwell. If the ears are back a very long time and there is a second llama too close, it actually can spit a warning with its nose up in the air. But that rarely occurs. The reason  might be envy concerning food or fighting against each other. And that‘s the way a female tells the male to stop mating.

Blacknose Sheep (Valais Blacknose)

Typical are the black coloured nose, eyes, ears, front knees, ankles and hooves in the otherwise white fur. Females tend to have black tail spots. Both genders sport twisted horns. Males weigh beween 80 and 100 kg, females 70 to 80 kg on average. Wool covers their body, legs and head evenly. You can annually get 3.5 kg – 4.5 kg of wool from the males (rams), 3 – 4 kg from the females (ewes). It is rough, has got long fibres of more than 10 cm. After a long time of inbreeding the offspring lose the typical black colouring. The Blacknose can be with young at any time. They produce about 1.6 lambs per year and they mature late. The Valais Blacknose is adapted very well to the harsh conditions of living in the high mountains. They are territorial and  frugal, good climbers and able to graze even on the stoniest and the steepest slopes. Because of its appearance, long limbs, its horns, tough nature, and rough wool it is regarded as a primitive race, closely related to the ancestral sheep.